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The Intrepid Entrepreneur

The Intrepid Entrepreneur is here to inspire those who are hell-bent on becoming a kick-ass entrepreneur, striving to level-up their business that they’ve started or are gearing up to launch their incredible ideas into successful small businesses! Join Kristin Carpenter-Ogden, founder of LivingUber and Verde Brand Communications, as she interviews inspirational, motivated, and kick-ass small business owners who have made their mark on the outdoor industry.
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Now displaying: October, 2016
Oct 28, 2016

Listen at:  Intrepidentrepreneur.net/nathan-rose

What’s the difference between crowdfunding and equity crowdfunding? And how do you know which one, if either, is right for your company?

I’m sitting down with Nathan Rose of Assemble Advisory, an equity crowdfunding agency, to get his inside scoop on what makes it worth using equity to access capital. Nathan’s talking about researching platforms, getting to know your customers, and deciding how to spend your time. You can’t do everything!

We’re also getting into the difference between equity investors and mass crowdfunding, and what you can expect from both groups. Nathan’s offering a few sneak-peeks into what he has to say about these different techniques in his new book, Equity Crowdfunding.  

Equity crowdfunding is changing, it’s not just for brand new startups anymore. Whether you’re just getting started or looking to expand, Nathan’s full of expert advice on how to approach this new opportunity.

Bravery in Business Quote

“Equity crowdfunding allows you to raise much more money than a Kickstarter campaign” - Nathan Rose

(click to tweet)

 

Cliff Notes:

  • Equity crowdfunding campaigns should be run differently than crowdfunding campaigns. The marketing plans are very different because you’re looking for different kinds of investors.
  • Shareholders in equity crowdfunding will be around for the long term.  They should expect to not make money for a while, until the company sells or becomes large enough that other people are willing to buy
  • Investors in equity crowdfunding are often more experienced. They know what to expect and the risks involved.
  • Equity crowdfunding used to just be for startups, but now it’s starting to be used by existing companies looking to expand and branch out.
  • Stay in touch with your investors, even when you don’t have big news. Shareholders should be given regular updates on how your company is doing, not just when you’re raising money.
  • Crowd funding is public in a way that asking for money from the bank isn’t. Even if your campaign isn’t successful, it gains positive media attention and helps your business to get organized and self-evaluate.
  • Larger companies used to pay lots of money for information on their clients and potential customers. Crowdfunding allows you direct access and feedback from your clients.
  • Spend your time in proportion to the money. One investor with a lot of assets is worth going out to meet and talk with, sometimes more than a lot of small social media interactions.
  • Before you start any crowdfunding, make sure that you’ve validated your product and have guaranteed that there is market interest in your company.
  • Do your research before choosing a platform. Make sure you know the audience and policies of each platform.
 

“It’s important to communicate with investors even when you don’t have big news to say” - Nathan Rose

(click to tweet)

Resources:

AssembleAdvisory.com

Book:

Amazon.com/Equity-Crowdfunding-Complete-Startups-Companies

 

Listen at:  Intrepidentrepreneur.net/nathan-rose

 
Oct 21, 2016

Show Notes: IntrepidEntrepreneur.net/Sarah-Carpenter

We talk a lot about bootstrapping and starting up a brand-new business on this podcast. But this week I’m getting input about a different kind of entrepreneurial challenge: taking over a legacy brand.

Sarah Carpenter is sharing what made her and her partners decide to buy the American Avalanche Institute, and how they’ve been working to refine and expand the idea of its founder. It’s all about passion and commitment to a greater, shared vision.

We’re getting into the benefits and challenges of having business partners, working on a team, and the importance planning ahead. Sarah’s also talking about the value of community in the outdoor markets, and taking advantage of her resources.

This is such an insightful episode not just for those of you taking over an older business, but for anyone working in a community.  

Bravery in Business Quote

“The approach that has helped me is just a willingness to learn, a willingness to take in information and adapt to new ideas, new approaches.” - Sarah Carpenter

(click to tweet)

The Cliff Notes

  • Before you start a new venture, ask yourself “Am I able and excited to carry on this project?”
  • Think of your business partners as a sort of second marriage. You’re committed to them and to a bigger project, so you work hard to communicate clearly and respectfully.  
  • Look for the big picture. Don’t just hire people who share your vision, but look for people that are also industry professionals and bring their own skill sets to the table.
  • Have a plan and a conversation about it with your team before you walk out the door or start a new project. Don’t plan to make decisions along the way.
  • Always be willing to learn and take in new information and ideas.  You can be strong-willed and opinionated, but don’t block out the input of other people.
  • Be a resource for your customers in as many mediums as possible.
  • Respect the value of the community you work in, and take advantage of the resources and expertise of others in your field.

 

“But I think the beauty of our industry is not only are we passionate, but we also come from this place of wanting to do good.” - Sarah Carpenter

(click to tweet)

Resources:

americanavalancheinstitute.com

avalanche.institute@gmail.com

avalanche.org

Facebook: American Avalanche Institute, https://www.facebook.com/americanavalancheinstitute/

Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat : @avyinstitute

Show Notes: IntrepidEntrepreneur.net/Sarah-Carpenter

Oct 14, 2016

We’ve all heard people talk about “hustle”, the drive that keeps you going even when you’re having to do the nitty gritty work that doesn’t thrill you. It’s an important part of any entrepreneur’s toolbox.

My guest this week has a serious amount of hustle and an equal amount of passion for what he’s doing. Neil Patel is the co-founder of marketing software programs including KISSmetrics and Crazy Egg, as well as the co-author of a new book, Hustle: The Power to Charge Your Life with Money, Meaning, and Momentum.

Neil’s talking with me about one of the biggest questions we all face: what exactly is my passion? He’s giving me some tips on how to find the things that you’re actually excited about and let go of the things you only think you’re excited about.

We’re also digging into working backwards to achieve your goals, what to do with feedback and criticism, and focusing on quality content to drive up traffic.

Neil is a highly successful entrepreneur as well as a marketing genius, I’m thrilled he’s here to share his expert knowledge--you’ll want to take advantage of his advice.

 

Bravery in Business Quote

“You're going to make mistakes as an entrepreneur. But if you can avoid making those same mistakes over and over again, you'll increase your chance at succeeding.” - Neil Patel

(click to tweet)

 

Cliff Notes

  • The internet is becoming more personalized. Now, it knows your location what you and your friends like and tries to show you information based on that. Neil thinks it’s going to become even more extreme in the future and make faster connections in terms of marketing.
  • Co-market with people who already have a good audience for your product. Look for people with established followings that would also be interested in your work, and joint venture with them on a project.
  • It can feel like the middle class is disappearing and like there is no way to success if you weren’t born wealthy, but this isn’t true. People need to start looking for nontraditional ways to the top, since the traditional methods are no longer working.
  • Work backwards. Think of your goal, and then write down what you need to do to get to that goal. Then, just try to spend 10 minutes on one of the steps. After 10 minutes, evaluate if what you’re doing is helping you get closer to the goal or not.
  • You’re going to make a lot of mistakes as an entrepreneur. When you realize you’ve made a mistake, sit down and think about why it happened. Learn from what you did so that you don’t make the same mistake over again.
  • When people tell you know, or criticize you after a failure, choose to listen to their feedback. You don’t have to follow their advice or internalize the criticisms, but listen to it and evaluate it as you keep pushing forward.
  • If you’re not passionate about what you’re doing, don’t do it. Only do things that you’re really passionate about right now, because once you lose the spark, it’s really hard to reignite it.
  • Try different things. Sometimes, we don’t know what we’re actually passionate about. Start something, and if you don’t love it, stop it and start something else. What you love now is not always what you thought it would be ten years ago.
  • Focus on quality over quantity. Create the best content, not just a lot of it, and then work on getting people to come to your site. Spend more time marketing than creating content.
  • If your content is really good, it’s more likely that clients and visitors to your site will quote and link to it to share the content. This kind of marketing is much more effective than self-promotion.  
  • Kristin is giving away 5 copies of his book.

 

“I would say that with passion, the biggest problem that people face is actually not knowing what they're passionate about.” - Neil Patel

(click to tweet)

Resources

 

HustleGeneration.com

NeilPatel.com

CrazyEgg.com

KissMetrics.com

HelloBar.com

Listen at:  intrepidentrepreneur.net/neil-patel

Oct 7, 2016

Show Notes: IntrepidEntrepreneur.net/diane-martinez

How many times have you planned an event and not known how approach getting the word out? Marketing and community building can be overwhelming, there are so many different strategies and mediums to work with!

I’m getting super practical on this week’s podcast, and answering questions from Diane Martinez, co-founder of the Rough Riders cycling event in Angel Fire, New Mexico, about how to grow attendance at this amazing event.

We’re talking through Diane’s current strategy to build attendance, and then I’m digging into how to spread the word by using your email list, rewarding loyalty, and getting faithful customers to share their experiences.

We’re also discussing into the importance of a good website, when to do a marketing push, and how to get organized with your blog posts!

This special episode is full of hands-on advice for any entrepreneur looking to raise awareness and build community around their product.

Bravery in Business Quote

“Often times you just have to ask people to do something, and they’ll do it. That’s the Call to Action. It’s a simple thing” - Kristin Carpenter-Ogden

(click to tweet)

Cliff Notes:

  • Use email lists effectively. Don’t make the assumption that people don’t want to hear from you very often. Make sure you’re sending quality content that people will want to read, but give them the benefit of the doubt in terms of interest.
  • Who is your ideal avatar? What stories do they want to hear from you, and how are you going to connect them with that? Don’t think of these as obstacles, but as plans to get organized to address.
  • Create special ways to reward loyalty and get people to keep coming back. Send VIP communications to your loyal customers, with special information and opportunities tailored to this group. At events, think of a way to treat your long term customers in a way that will makes others want to become one, but without seeming exclusive.
  • Ask fans what kind of resource based content they might like more of. Look for what people are interested in, and what you can do to respond to those special interests.
  • Your website is a point of entry for possible new clients. Offer information about the experience of your product, rather than the facts. Think about why your project is unique, and show that to your customers.
  • Set up a themed editorial content calendar to organize your appeals and marketing pushes. Organize your blogs and emails around these themes, for consistency and to showcase special aspects of the event/product.
  • If you’re referencing other companies, sites or locations, tag them in your posts, and send a quick email letting them know they’ve been featured. Consider also sending them a quick line or two to post on their own site about your event’s use of their space, photos, etc.
  • Use raving fans to reach out to other people. Feature them in blog posts, or let them do an Instagram takeover to show people the event through their eyes, what they will get to experiences as a participant or customers.
  • If it’s worked, don’t get rid of your original marketing plan, but expand it into new venues to appeal to different kinds of clients. Just because paper fliers are working doesn’t mean that social media won’t be effective with also, or with a different demographic.
  • Be remarkable to your avatar, but pay attention to their needs. Position all your other options and products as resources to help them achieve their goals, not lesser products.  
  • Use paid positioning on social media/ marketing strategically. Wait until an important moment, or a new product, so that people will have something new and interesting to click on.

“You want to try and be remarkable to your avatar and not to everyone” - Kristin Carpenter-Ogden

(click to tweet)

Resources:

RoughRiders200.com

EventBrite.com

Show Notes: IntrepidEntrepreneur.net/diane-martinez

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